Overhead

Non Dominant Hand Catch
Coach hand/racquet feeds ball and P catches the ball w/ his non-dominant hand.
P’s non-dominant arm is fully extended up.
P catches the ball in the same location that he would make contact when hitting an overhead.

Inside Out Forehand

Receive Hockey Pass on FH
Roll or pass the ball/puck to P’s (player’s) BH.
P shifts left and receives ball on Forehand (simulates tennis right-hander)
Note that this is the right-handed hockey player’s move, and that a right-handed tennis player may well play left in hockey.

Wall Slice

Slice Narrow Target
To help w/ direction one can extend swing forward.
Having a narrow wall target helps w/ this.
P (player) can drop feed the ball to himself initially.
Then a Slice rally is possible.
How long a consecutive rally can you have ? (hitting the target)

Slice Speed/Distance Training
The slice target will be above the 1st line (approx. 4 feet) and below the 2nd line (approx. 10 feet)
This deters the slice from turning into a lob.
P can drop the ball and slice it at the wall.
Gradually back up from the wall.
To get the distance, P can step in (right foot steps forward just before contact)
The speed of the swing also needs to increase.
Try to keep the arm stable. For example, the elbow shouldn’t come up.
The racquet is moving along a high to low path.

Footwork

Footwork + Ball Around Back
Do the below 1st w/ shuffling, then cross-overs, then cross-behinds, then Cariocca.
While, for eg., shuffling, P passes tennis ball around his back repeatedly.
Try it w/ ball direction different from shuffle direction as well.

Footwork + Toss & Catch Ball
Do the below 1st w/ shuffling, then cross-overs, then cross-behinds, then Cariocca.
While, for eg., shuffling, P tosses tennis ball up and catches it.
Try it w/ both right and left hands.

Footwork + 2-Ball Juggle
Do the below 1st w/ shuffling, then cross-overs, then cross-behinds, then Cariocca.
While, for eg., shuffling, P juggles 2 balls.

Footwork + Basketball Bounce
Do the below 1st w/ shuffling, then cross-overs, then cross-behinds, then Cariocca.
While, for eg., shuffling, P bounces basketball.
Try it w/ both hands, not just the dominant hand.

Footwork + Volley-Up
Do the below 1st w/ shuffling, then cross-overs, then cross-behinds, then Cariocca.
While, for eg., shuffling, P volleys-up (bounces ball up w/o it hitting the ground) repeatedly.

Wall Volley

Start Volley
Analogous to the Start Rally shot, this is when a Player (P) tosses the ball up and volleys it himself, ie. P plays it out of the air (before it hits the ground.)
Contact should be out front, and at shoulder/chest height.
Racquet face is open.
Racquet follows a high to low path.
Angle of racquet doesn’t change during the stroke.
The racquet path is short (not a long swing like a regular groundstroke.)
The trunk turns to the right (right-hander) so the left-hand is active and to the right.

Volley Up
The ball comes back quite quickly when you volley against the wall.
To slow things down, so that you can improve your volley technique, you can optionally volley-up before volleying back to the wall.
You could call this a self volley.
The ball hits the wall and you volley it (in the air) up to yourself.
Before it hits the ground, you then volley it back towards the wall.

FH Volley-Up + FH Volley
Both the volley-up and the volley occur on the FH side.

BH Volley-Up + BH Volley
Both the volley-up and the volley occur on the BH side.

FH Volley-Up + BH Volley
Volley-up w/ the FH, but then hit a BH volley.
The volley-up then must be directed to the left (for the right-hander.)

BH Volley-Up + FH Volley
Volley-up w/ the BH, but then hit a FH volley.
The volley-up then must be directed to the right (for the right-hander.)

FH/BH Alternating Volley Rally
Can be done w/ volley-up or not.
You hit a FH volley, then a BH volley, so both volleys must be hit diagonally to minimize required movement.

Start Volley + Baseball Catch
(Note: this could be done w/o a glove.)
P is wearing a glove on his left hand (throws/plays right-handed)
The ball is in P’s glove.
P lofts the ball up w/ the glove.
P does a Start Volley against the wall.
P catches the ball in the air (off the wall) w/ his glove.
P stays balanced.
P increases the difficulty by sending the start volley further to the left or directly at himself etc.
P can also move closer to the wall for catching difficulty.
P can move farther from the wall to increase difficulty of Start Volley.

Age Groups

2018:
U9: Turning 8 or 9 in 2018 (born in or after 2009)
U10: Turning 10 in 2018 (born in or after 2008)
U12: Turning 11 or 12 (born in or after 2006)
U14: Turning 13 or 14 (born in or after 2004)
U16: Turning 15 or 16 (born in or after 2002)
U18: Turning 17 or 18 (born in or after 2000)

Junior Racquets

Sweet Spot (109 Street) has higher quality junior racquets as described below.

Solid Racquets

These are graphite racquets that are just shorter (and smaller gripped) versions of the adult 27″ size. As you shift to a green dot level, you might want to consider these.

Semi Solid Racquets

These are a hybrid of graphite and aluminum. You can actually get these at the 23″ length (25/26″ as well.) They are a step up from the aluminum-only introductory racquets. You want at least this quality as you shift to green dot ball tennis, as the cheaper (strictly aluminum) racquets can be somewhat flimsy.

Wall Bump Up

A nice progression when playing against the wall is to bump the ball up and let it bounce before hitting the next shot. So ie. the ball bounces off the wall, and then hits the ground for the 1st time: then, before it hits the ground a 2nd time, P (player) bumps it up (vertically.) Bumping gives P time to prepare for his next shot. Of course the Bump-Up itself may need to be practised.

The key to bumping up is to orient the racquet like a frying pan (on the stove.) And then push purely upwards (extend upwards) somewhat gently.

Bump-Up on the Dot
Use a flat dot on the ground as a target.
P bumps-up the ball to about shoulder height and tries to get the ball to land on the dot.

Bump-Up on the Dot w/ Shuffling
P must shuffle to the left (and later to the right) after every bump-up.
P ends up circling the dot ideally.

Wall Start Rally

The 1st shot against the wall is an open faced tap.
There’s not much follow-thru to this shot. Nothing like the rainbow.
It needs to go fairly high and soft, so that the player has time to prepare for the next shot.
The player starts sideways.
The ball needs to be dropped in front of the player.
If it’s a progressive ball that doesn’t bounce much, drop it from a higher position (hold your hand higher.)

Softest Start Rally
Often the student needs to master this shot 1st (before any rallying can occur.)
Place a marker away from the wall.
The Start Rally shot is not allowed to land beyond that marker.
Gradually move the marker closer to the wall.

Start Rally into Basket
Place a basket (or several baskets/containers) near the wall.
P (player) must loft the ball, so that it hits high on the wall and then bounces into the basket.